Whereas newspaper coverage is pretty much confined to stories that are deemed acceptable by a paper's corporate owners, magazines usually have more freedom to target specific audiences and advocate specific opinions and beliefs. As a result, two different magazines will often reach completely different conclusions about the same topic.

Although it's tempting to read only those magazines that support your own opinions, take some time to learn what people who have different political views or are from another country or continent might have to say. For foreign magazines, visit one of the websites listed below, or visit your favorite search engine and try to hunt up some magazines not listed in this book.

  • Online magazine that offers an alternative to mainstream investigative journalism. Regularly covers topics that the mainstream either ignores or glosses over, such as the drug war, sexual politics, and health issues (

  • The Economist Comprehensive magazine that provides news about events from around the world, including places most American high school graduates can't find on a map (

  • Federal Computer Week Offers stories about how various U.S. government agencies are using computers to (hopefully) streamline their organization and improve efficiency (

  • Monday Morning Lebanon's English-language weekly news magazine (

  • The National Review Conservative American magazine providing its own unique point of view on American politics and international events (

  • The New American An ultra-conservative magazine that takes American patriotism to the extreme. Reading this magazine will certainly open your eyes to the way people can interpret world events (

  • Philippine News Link Links to an enormous range of newspapers and magazines that cover the Philippines, including The Manila Times, Filipinas Magazine, Asiaweek, and The Manila Bulletin (

  • ZMag Available in English, French, Spanish, and Swedish, and billing itself as a magazine for people concerned about social change (